Neuroscience

Neuroscience

Neuroscience Honours » Assessments

Research NEUR444X (36 UOC, 75%)
  • Project proposal presentation 5%
  • Project proposal document 10%
  • Research thesis 80%
  • Lay Summary for thesis 5%
Coursework (25%)
  • NEUR4411 (6 UOC) 12.5%
  • NEUR4421 (6 UOC) 12.5%
The Project Proposal assessment (proposal presentation, and rejoinder) are worth 15% of the final research mark. The main purpose of the Project Proposal assessment is to provide timely and formative feedback to the student regarding their project, including details of design, conduct and analysis. The structure of the proposal and assessment process are modelled after the National Health and Research Council Project Grant Scheme. This process allows the Committee to raise issues around feasibility and fallback plans, and models the iterative process of how science (grants, papers) is actually conducted.

Project Presentation (5%)
  • Students will outline their research proposal to the Neuroscience Honours Committee and other interested supervisors and students. The presentation is to be up to 10 minutes long, and students may use PowerPoint but must include no more than six slides plus title slide. The slides can be 'built up', but replacement of any element on a slide is not permitted. The presentation should convey the aims, hypotheses, experimental design & rationale, outcomes and significance of the proposed research along with a timeline of the honours year.
  • Students are expected to have rehearsed the talk with their supervisors; reading of notes will not be allowed.
  • Professional attire and delivery are expected.
  • The presentation is followed by up to 10 minutes of questions and discussion between the candidate, supervisor(s), and the panel regarding the project, especially with regard to its feasibility in the timeframe. Students should expect to answer questions about the experimental design details.
  • Students will receive written feedback on their talk from the audience.
Project Proposal & Rejoinder (10%)
  • The written proposal should be no more than 4000 words. The proposal consists of an approximately 2000 words overview of the background literature followed by a research plan of no more than 2000 words that outlines the project, covering aims, hypotheses, experimental design & rationale, outcomes & significance, and timeline.
  • Supervisor(s) are expected to read and provide editorial input on the proposal; however, they must not be the author of the document.
  • A detailed description of the formatting for the Project Proposal is in the course outline.
  • Project Proposal marking guidelines are in the course outline.
  • Students should submit two stapled hard copies to the SoMS Admin Office (Room 255, Level 2, Wallace Wurth Building) by 24 April 2020 (12 noon). Students should also submit the Project Proposal via Turnitin on Moodle and send a PDF copy by email to the Honours Convenor.
  • Students will receive written comments from two assessors on their proposal document. The student will then respond in writing to the comments addressing all points (whether or not they have a question mark at the end) and justify their response. There is a strict 2-page limit (2-cm margins; 12-point Times New Roman) to the rejoinder document including any figures and references.
The Research Thesis is worth 80% of the research mark.
  • The written 8,000 – 10,000 words thesis will be marked by two examiners. Details for its preparation are in the course outline.
  • Supervisor(s) are expected to read and provide editorial input on multiple drafts of the thesis aside from the discussion. Supervisors are only allowed to read and comment on a single version of the thesis discussion. Discussion feedback is limited to constructive feedback on the structure of the discussion, its strengths and weaknesses, and the general writing style. Supervisors are permitted to draw the student’s attention to any errors or inconsistencies but must NOT under any circumstances, rewrite any words, phrases or sentences. Students with more than 1 supervisor may receive feedback from each supervisor; however, the supervisors must be given the same version of the discussion.
  • Students should submit three spiral-bound copies to the SoMS Admin Office (Room 255, Level 2, Wallace Wurth Building) by 06 November 2020 (12 noon). Students should also submit the Research Thesis via Turnitin on Moodle and send a PDF copy by email to the Honours Convenor. The bound copies will not be returned.
  • The supervisor(s) will be provided with a copy of the submitted document and asked to confirm the validity of the data and rate the student’s independence in generating, conducting, and writing up the research. This feedback will not contribute formally to the mark but may be used by the examiners in arriving at their decision. The feedback form will be emailed to supervisors prior to the thesis submission date.
  • The grading criteria used by the examiners are included at the end of the course outline. Where there is a discrepancy of greater than 10 marks, the two examiners will confer and where possible, reach an agreement in consultation with the Honours Convenor in the School. However, where agreement is not possible, the thesis will be examined by a third marker. The closest of the three marks will then be averaged to determine the final grade.
The Lay Summary of the thesis is worth 5% of the research mark.
  • This 2000 character or less summary of the research thesis is targeted at an educated audience without a scientific background. Preparation guidelines will be distributed one month prior to the due date.
  • The lay summaries will be marked by Neuroscience Honours Committee members.
The Coursework component (NEUR4411 and NEUR4421) comprises 25% of the final honours mark (12.5% per course). In NEUR4411 Behavioural Neuroscience, students learn about neuroscience from a psychological perspective. Students will be introduced to a range of techniques and learn how to critically evaluate the primary literature. NEUR4421 will be taught from a biomedical science perspective and consists of half-day workshops covering different cutting-edge neuroscience techniques, statistics and thesis writing. Together, the coursework will provide students with a broad knowledge base and appreciation of neuroscientific developments complementing the deep learning provided by the research project. The coursework is assessed by the staff that delivered the material.