Neuroscience

Neuroscience

Honours Supervisors » SoMS Honours Supervisors

This page is currently under review to be updated, projects may not be current. Please refer to the Potential Research Projects for 2022 (Honours, Masters, PhD)  document for 2022 additonal projects.  

Group/Lab Name

Name

Research Area / Thesis topics

Contact details

Status
Human Sensory Neuroscience, Sensorimotor Control and Bionics A/Prof Ingvars Birznieks

Research Area: Sensory neuroscience; neural code - encoding of tactile sensory information in health and disease (stroke, diabetic neuropathy, chronic back pain); sensorimotor control of the human hand; haptics, artificial intelligence, biomedical engineering; bionics; robotics; computational neuroscience. 

This theme has projects suitable for medical, biomedical science, psychology and engineering students of various specialisations. International students are welcome.

Techniques: Psychophysics, microneurography (recordings from single sensory neurons in humans) and other electrophysiology methods, signal processing, modelling, behavioural experiments, robotic control.

Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) & SoMS Physiology/ Cellular and Systems Physiology

Level 3, Wallace Wurth West

P: 9385 8311

NeuRA Supervisor profile

Current. Updated October 2021
Cellular Mechanotransduction Dr Kate Poole
Research Area: Gating and regulation of force-sensing ion channels
 
Techniques: Patch-clamp electrophysiology, cell culture, substrate microfabrication
 
This project will investigate how the sensitivity of force-sensing ion channels is regulated at the contact points between cells and the extracellular matrix. We are using deformable, microfabricated surfaces to apply forces directly to cell-matrix contacts, allowing us to quantitatively measure force-sensing ion channel activity.

SoMS Physiology/ Translational Neuroscience Facility & Single Molecule Science

Level 3, Wallace Wurth West

P: 9385 1764

TNF website

 
Neurobiology Research Lab A/Prof Andrew Moorhouse Research Area: KCC2, GABA, Epilepsy, Brain plasticity
 
Techniques: Electrophysiology, Brain slices. Neuronal Culture, Spines, EEG
 
We have a number of projects available related to the plasticity of inhibitory synaptic transmission in disease.  Our primary focus is on KCC2 and GABA signalling in epilepsy, where we are striving to provide better therapies to treat different forms of drug-resistant epilepsy. We apply animal models of brain function and seizures, and combine single neuron investigations with neural circuit analysis and whole animal behaviour and EEG. Interested students should contact Dr Moorhouse to discuss these projects further.

SoMS Physiology/ Cellular and Systems Physiology

302, Level 3, Wallace Wurth West

P: 9385 2575

 
Metabolic and Neuropharmacology Group Prof Margaret Morris

Research Area: Brain mechanisms involved in appetite and the changes that occur during the development of obesity; the link between obesity and stress; binge-eating and effects on the brain; the role of NPY on absence seizures in epilepsy

Techniques: Obesity models; behavioural measurements, gene expression, hormone measurements; immunohistochemistry.

SoMS Pharmacology

Level 3, Wallace Wurth East

 

Current. October

2021

Molecular Neuroscience Dr Natasha Kumar  
Research Area: Inhibitory neuropeptides in respiratory chemoreceptors: what is their normal role in ventilatory behaviour? How is this role altered during acute (e.g. exercise) and chronic respiratory/environmental stress (e.g. living in a cave, living at high altitude, obesity hypoventilation syndrome).
 
Techniques: Transgenic mice, in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, retrograde tracing, rodent behaviour, microscopy and image analysis
 
SoMS Pharmacology
 
325, Level 3, Wallace Wurth East
 
 
 

Current. October

2021

Neuropathic Pain Treatment

A/Prof Gila Moalem-Taylor

Research Area: : Neuroimmune crosstalk in animal models of nervous system injury, autoimmune diseases, and chronic pain including peripheral nerve injury, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. 

Techniques: Animal surgery, behavioural tests (e.g. measurements of pain, locomotion), immunohistochemistry, cell culture, flow cytometry, Western blot, PCR, and electrophysiology.

SoMS Physiology/ Translational Neuroscience Facility

Level 3, Wallace Wurth East

P: 9385 2478

Current. October 2021

Neuropharmacology and Brain Injury

Dr Nicole Jones

Research Area: Stroke, hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, neuroprotection and brain repair.

Techniques: In vitro and in vivo models of brain injury, western blotting, small animal behaviour, immunohistochemistry.

SoMS Pharmacology

Level 3, Wallace Wurth East

 

Current 

2021

Neuroplasticity in Memory and Addiction Dr John Power
 
Our group investigates the cellular mechanisms of memory formation.  We aim to identify of novel mechanisms that modulate or preserve neuronal connections that may be translated into treatments for disorders of impaired or aberrant connectivity such as Alzheimer’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder and addiction.  Our approach includes patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings and live-cell high resolution fluorescence imaging.
 
Honours projects examine 1) cellular mechanisms of addiction, 2) role of the endoplasmic reticulum in coupling synaptic activity and gene-transcription, 3) modulation of synaptic plasticity.   
 

SoMS Physiology/ Translational Neuroscience Facility

Level 3, Wallace Wurth West

P: 9385 2910

TNF website

 

Sensori-Motor Neuroprotection

Prof Gary Housley

Research Area: Neuroprotection and repair in sensori-motor pathways: bionics-based gene delivery with cochlear implants, noise and age-related hearing loss, brain injury repair (stroke models). 

Techniques: In vivo imaging, cellular and systems electrophysiology, gene knock-outs, immunohistochemistry, electrotherapeutics, gene therapy.

SoMS Physiology/ Translational Neuroscience Facility

Level 3, Wallace Wurth West

TNF website

Current October 2021