News & Events

Image - Molecular Control of Cholinergic Interneuron Activity

Molecular Control of Cholinergic Interneuron Activity

Friday, 10 May 2019
Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar Series Speaker: Dr Nathalie Dehorter, Eccles Institute for Neuroscience, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, ANU
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Image - Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. Synaptic Dysfunction in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. Synaptic Dysfunction in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Friday, 3 May 2019
Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar Series Speaker: Dr Sarah Gordon, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, VIC Dr Sarah Gordon was awarded her PhD from the University of Newcastle in 2009. She undertook postdoctoral studies at the University of Edinburgh in the lab of Prof Mike Cousin, where she defined the function of the integral synaptic vesicle (SV) protein synaptophysin. She went on to determine the pathological roles of synaptophysin, and another key SV protein, synaptotagmin, in intellectual disability.
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Image - Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. Misfolding to mortality: proteostasis collapse as a driver of aging and death.

Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. Misfolding to mortality: proteostasis collapse as a driver of aging and death.

Tuesday, 23 April 2019
Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar Series Speaker: Dr Adam de Graff, Methuselah Health UK Ltd, Cambridge, UK Why do the damaging effects of oxidative metabolism harm some proteins but not others? Why are many disease-causing protein mutations of little consequence to the young, yet even the strongest alleles can give rise to disease when we are old?
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Image - Imaging tumour behaviour and drug targeting in live tissue: insights from intravital biosensor imaging

Imaging tumour behaviour and drug targeting in live tissue: insights from intravital biosensor imaging

Wednesday, 17 April 2019
School of Medical Sciences 2019 Seminar Series Speaker: A/Professor Paul Timpson, NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and Head of the Invasion and Metastasis Laboratory, Garvan Institute of Medical Research. Conjoint Associate Professor, St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Australia.
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Image - Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. Cryo-EM studies of E. coli ATP synthase

Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. Cryo-EM studies of E. coli ATP synthase

Friday, 12 April 2019
Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Speaker: Dr Alastair Stewart, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute
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Image - Neuroimmune interactions and the development of disabling neuropathic pain states

Neuroimmune interactions and the development of disabling neuropathic pain states

Friday, 5 April 2019
Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Speaker: Dr Nathan Fiore, Department of Physiology, SoMS, UNSW
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Image - Vascular Calcification – Harder than it looks

Vascular Calcification – Harder than it looks

Wednesday, 3 April 2019
Mechanisms of Disease and Translational Research Seminar Speaker: Dr Belinda Di Bartolo, Kolling Institute of Medical Research Belinda completed her PhD in 2009 at the Heart Research Institute in Sydney. In 2011 she was awarded an NHMRC Early Career Training Fellowship to undertake research at the Centre for Vascular Research.
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Image - Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. A Question of Balance - Best laid plans of mice and men…

Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar. A Question of Balance - Best laid plans of mice and men…

Friday, 29 March 2019
Neuroscience & Non-Communicable Diseases Seminar Series Biography: Prof Alan Brichta is Head of Anatomy and Co-Director of the Brain and Mental Health Priority Research Centre at the University of Newcastle. His research interests in the structure and function of the peripheral and central vestibular system. His recent studies have focused on vestibular hair cells of the inner ear and their complex relationship with closely associated nerve fibres.
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