News & Events

Image - The search to extend lifespan is gaining ground, but can we truly reverse the biology of ageing?

The search to extend lifespan is gaining ground, but can we truly reverse the biology of ageing?

Friday, 31 March 2017

OPINION: It was once a fringe topic for scientists and a pseudo-religious dream for others. But research into the biology of ageing, and consequently extending the lifespan of humans and animals, has become a serious endeavour.

Ageing research is often promoted as the key to the “eternal fountain of youth”, or an “elixir of immortality”. But the true promise of ageing research is that rather than tackling individual diseases one at a time, a single drug would treat all the diseases that arise in old age, at once.

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Image - Explainer: what’s cytomegalovirus and why do pregnant women need to know about it?

Explainer: what’s cytomegalovirus and why do pregnant women need to know about it?

Monday, 3 April 2017

OPINION: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus transmitted from person to person via body fluids like urine or saliva. For people with a healthy immune system, CMV is likely to cause no more than a temporary fever or headache. But when a pregnant woman is infected, the results can be far more serious. The Conversation

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Image - High-fat diet hurts the microbiota in the oesophagus

High-fat diet hurts the microbiota in the oesophagus

Monday, 3 April 2017

UNSW researchers have observed how microbiota in the oesophagus is affected by a high-fat diet, depleting known beneficial bacteria and increasing the levels of “bad” bacteria.

The team’s paper, published in Scientific Reports, found a high-fat diet affects the microbiota in the oesophagus of rats.

First author Dr Nadeem Kaakoush says two other interesting things were observed.

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Image - Gene research gives new insight on pancreatic cancer

Gene research gives new insight on pancreatic cancer

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

New research shows how invading pancreatic tumours rely on surrounding cells – called stromal cells − to “remodel” tissue for invasion.

Researchers are now using this new knowledge to design more effective drugs to tackle the disease, and by measuring the genes that control this system in patients, they could better predict survival.

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Image - UNSW scientists unveil a giant leap for anti-ageing

UNSW scientists unveil a giant leap for anti-ageing

Friday, 24 March 2017

UNSW researchers have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing, improves DNA repair and could even help NASA get its astronauts to Mars.

In a paper published in Science today, the team identifies a critical step in the molecular process that allows cells to repair damaged DNA.

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Image - Working towards a drug to limit brain injury

Working towards a drug to limit brain injury

Thursday, 16 March 2017

UNSW researchers are teaming with an Australian drug development company to discover new treatments for the debilitating after-effects of brain injury, including stroke.

The research is focusing on the “cascade” effect that occurs after the primary injury, where damage continues to brain cells for hours and days after the primary injury event.

The collaboration with drug developers Noxopharm could result in the design of a neuroprotective compound that blocks the ability of calcium to enter healthy nerve cells, stemming the tide of damage.

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Image - Probiotics may not always be a silver bullet for better health

Probiotics may not always be a silver bullet for better health

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

To combat the effects of a poor diet, probiotics may be just the thing. However, surprising new research from UNSW suggests probiotics are much less effective when taken alongside a balanced diet, and could even impair certain aspects of memory.

Researchers from UNSW Medicine studied the impact of a commonly used probiotic on the gut health and cognitive function of rats, which were fed either a healthy diet or a “cafeteria diet” high in saturated fat and sugar.

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Image - Head space workshop at UNSW is a no-brainer

Head space workshop at UNSW is a no-brainer

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

How reliable are your senses? What neurobiology can you perform with your office chair and a roll of masking tape? What do growing nerve cells look like? What can a comparison of human brains with apes and other animals teach us about how the brain works?

Find out on Wednesday 15 March 2017 at the Museum of Human Disease at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) when researchers help people to get hands on with their brains (well, almost).

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Image - World Cancer Day: Uncovering pancreatic cancer’s genetic tricks

World Cancer Day: Uncovering pancreatic cancer’s genetic tricks

Friday, 3 February 2017

Understanding how tumours reprogram their metabolism to make the raw materials for building new cells is a burgeoning area in the search for new cancer therapies. Yet the underlying genetic changes that allow pancreatic cancer cells to reprogram their metabolism are not well understood.

Now, a UNSW-led research team have discovered that while individual pancreatic tumours share common metabolic pathways to meet the needs of rapid cell growth, each finds a unique genetic solution to drive this adaptation.

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Image - Scans reveal brain secrets of the long lost Tasmanian tiger

Scans reveal brain secrets of the long lost Tasmanian tiger

Thursday, 19 January 2017

More than eighty years after the death of the last known Tasmanian tiger, scientists have used high tech imaging techniques to reconstruct the brain architecture of the apex predator for the first time, revealing new information about its intelligence and social life. 

The UNSW and Emory University study, published in PLOS ONE, used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to scan postmortem specimens of two thylacine brain specimens, both of which were about 100 years old.

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